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Apple is moving from Intel to its own ARM-Based Chips

Apple is moving from Intel to its own ARM-Based Chips
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The transition from Intel to ARM

Apple is moving from Intel to its own ARM-Based Chips
(Pic Credit: Apple)

At Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC 2020) Apple CEO Tim Cook announced that Apple is moving from Intel to its own ARM-Based Chips in the future. Meaning macOS will now support iOS apps and macOS apps on new devices in the future. Before Apple CEO revealed his plan to use Apple’s own ARM-powered silicon in future Macs, he provided some details about the transition to PowerPC, Mac OS X, and the move to Intel Chips.

ARM-powered Mac 2020

Apple is moving from Intel to its own ARM-Based Chips
(Pic Credit: Apple)

Apple aims to release its first Mac with Apple’s very own silicon at the end of 2020. The transition will probably take two years. New Intel-powered Macs are still in production, so Apple can’t just start using ARM-based Macs right away. “Most apps will just work,” says Apple’s CEO Tim Cook. Meaning you’ll be able to use these apps alongside iOS and macOS apps for the first time.

Apple took this step to improve the performance and make power consumption even less in future devices. The use of ARM-Based processor will help developers to write and optimize apps across every major Apple device. According to some sources Apple is designing its own range of SoC for Macs, with unique features for Mac.

App Transition

Apple is moving from Intel to its own ARM-Based Chips
(Pic Credit: Apple)

Apple’s own built-in apps will be updated to support the new silicon in macOS. The company also hopes that developers will update their apps as well. “The vast majority of developers can get their apps up and running in a matter of days,” stated Craig Federighi,

Apple’s senior vice president of software engineering stated “The vast majority of developers can get their apps up and running in a matter of days.”

Microsoft is already working on Office updates for the new Mac silicon, and three major apps PowerPoint, Word, and Excel are already working on the new Mac processors.

Apple is also working with Adobe to get these pro apps up and running on the new ARM-Powered chips. Apple demonstrated Lightroom and Photoshop running smoothly on its new Macs, with a 5GB Photoshop PSD also running smoothly with animations.

Rosetta 2

(Pic Credit: Apple)

The tech giant will also include a newer version of Rosetta in future macOS. Previously Apple used Rosetta for the PowerPC shift to Intel-based Macs, and the newer version will have the ability to automatically translate existing apps at install time. Meaning, even if developers haven’t fully optimized their apps, they should work just fine without any modification.

Developer Transition Kit

(Pic Credit: Apple)

Apply is also launching a new program named “quick start” for app developers with sample code and some documentation, and offering access to labs around the globe to help transition existing apps to Apple’s very own silicon chips. Apple is releasing a Developer Transition Kit for app developers with Apple’s A12Z chip, 16GB of RAM, and a 512GB SSD.  

Performance Issues

Apple is moving from Intel to its own ARM-Based Chips
(Pic Credit: Apple)

Apple’s move to its own ARM chips comes just as the company unveils macOS Big Sur. The new macOS includes big redesigns and some feature updates. Some analysts say Apple’s move to ARM is encouraged by Intel’s performance issues. ARM-powered chips improve the performance of mac significantly that is why Apple shifted from Intel-based chips.

ARM-Based Windows

(Pic Credit: Microsoft)

Well, Apple is not the only tech giant to move to ARM-powered chips, Microsoft nearly a decade ago also experimented. Microsoft started this transition before the release of Windows 8 in 2012. Even released the Windows RT exclusively designed for ARM-based chips. Since then Microsoft has been working with Qualcomm to integrate a custom SQ1 processor into Surface Pro X device.

These are some reasons why Apple is moving from Intel to its own ARM-Based Chips. But we will have to wait to experience ARM-powered Macs until they hit the market in December 2020.


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